Darren MacLean, the famed chef featured on Netflix’s The Final Table, and owner of Shokunin, listed as one of Canada’s top restaurants, has proposed in this excellent article –

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2019/10/04/darren-maclean-sustainability-is-dead.html 

– that sustainability is dead.

In follow up conversations with me, Darren has further elaborated on his view that we need to step beyond sustainability, to recovery.

At issue is how far does sustainability go?

A foundational cornerstone of sustainability is that the current generation does not deplete resources to the point where future generations cannot provide for themselves. But, as Darren has explained, in most cases, even when an organization pursues some level of sustainability, it seldom pursues becoming certified as a sustainable business and also seldom incorporates recovery as part of its plan. Just like a family budget, where most of the money goes to current needs, but some money is set aside for emergencies and some money is set aside for the future (retirement, vacations, college for the kids), sustainability metrics should include recovery of resource depletions, current needs, and future generational needs. All businesses should become ‘sustainably certified’, using a globally accepted sustainability standard, and all governments should adopt a PCF (past, current, future) sustainability metric in their planning.

David Goodman
CEO and President
Edenark Group
844-722-3937 (o)
561-512-2257 (m)
dgoodman@edenark.com